Oh Deer!

A cautionary tale…

As I drove east-to-west towards Joseph, Utah yesterday evening I traversed a 20 mile or so stretch of road where there were numerous signs warning about deer and elk crossing the road.  Even though it was dusk, I didn’t see any.  This driver wasn’t so lucky.

Cause:

IMG_20170830_103331237

Effect:

IMG_20170830_103228641

IMG_20170830_103240360

This car wasn’t here when I drove through last night (although the deer was apparently lurking nearby).  I stopped to make sure it hadn’t just happened.  There was no one in the vehicle, and only the driver’s side airbag had deployed.  The deer was about 50 yards back from the direction of travel.  I left a note saying I hoped the driver was OK and was on my way.  I saw two more dead deer, both still in the middle of my travel lane, within two miles of where this had happened.

********

Since we’re in cautionary tale mode, let’s talk again about hydration.

The first rule of hydration is, you don’t talk about hydration.  No…. wait…. that’s Fight Club.  The first rule of hydration is, I don’t care if you talk about it, just do it.  This is the High Desert.  That means it’s a double whammy.  High (meaning altitude) and Desert (meaning dry and hot).  I don’t think I was anywhere today where I was below 5,280 feet  (1 mile) of elevation.  You can’t drink too much water.  And you must stay ahead of it.  If your throat gets parched or if you show signs of dehydration, you may be in trouble.

I carry twelve bottles of water in my cooler, and since arriving in Utah I don’t even wait until they are all empty before refilling them, I do it when only half of them are empty.  I also carry several big bottles of water at all times (hence the trip to Dollar Tree).

Yesterday I stopped where a vehicle full of young people had pulled off the road with their hood up.  Their car had overheated and they had already used what little water they had with them.  I gave them two of my big bottles.  I had also come across a guy in a Jeep which was overheated back when I was in Washington state and he had used up all of his.  When you travel in this environment you have to be prepared.